Ja 89 Kuhakajātaka
The Story about the Cheat

In the present one monk gets his living in dishonest ways. When the Buddha finds out he tells a story of an ascetic in the past who tried to steal his supporter’s savings, all the while appearing as more than virtuous.

−−⏑⏑¦⏑−−−¦¦−−⏑⏑¦⏑−⏑− Siloka pathyā
1. Vācā va kira te āsi saṇhā, sakhilabhāṇino,
It seems that your words are gentle, and that they are kindly spoken,

⏑⏑−−¦⏑−−−¦¦−⏑−⏑¦⏑−⏑− Siloka pathyā
Tiṇamatte asajjittho, no ca nikkhasataṁ haran-ti.
He clings onto a mere straw, but does not take a hundred in gold.

Tattha, {1.377} vācāva kira te āsi, saṇhā sakhilabhāṇino ti,
In this connection, it seems that your words are gentle, and that they are kindly spoken,

“Pabbajitānaṁ tiṇamattam-pi adinnaṁ ādātuṁ na vaṭṭatī” ti,
thinking: “For those gone forth it is not suitable to take even a straw without it being given,”

evaṁ sakhilaṁ muduvacanaṁ vadantassa
thus kindly, delicate words are spoken

vācā eva kira te saṇhā āsi,
it seems that your words are gentle, Slight paraphrase of the verse.

vacanamattam-eva maṭṭhaṁ ahosī, ti attho.
it is smooth spoken words only, this is the meaning.

Tiṇamatte asajjittho ti,
He clings onto a mere straw,

kūṭajaṭila, ekissā tiṇasalākāya kukkuccaṁ kurumāno
cheating ascetic, being anxious about this blade of grass

tvaṁ satto āsatto laggo ahosi.
you cling, cleave to, attach to it.

No ca nikkhasataṁ haran-ti
But does not take a hundred in gold means

imaṁ pana nikkhasataṁ haranto asatto nillaggo va jātosī ti.
he is the kind to not cling to, not attach to, taking this hundred in gold. A nikkha is a measure of gold, PED says: a golden coin or a weight of gold (cp. a “pound sterling”) equal to 15 suvaṇṇas.