Ja 235 Vacchanakhajātaka
The Story about (the Wanderer) Vacchanakha

In the present a supporter of Ven. Ānanda’s tries to tempt him back to the lay life by offering him half his wealth. Ven. Ānanda refuses though, as the household life is full of suffering. The Buddha tells a story of similar events which unfolded in a previous life when the Bodhisatta was an ascetic called Vacchanakha.

⏑−⏑−¦−⏑⏑−¦¦⏑⏑−−¦⏑−⏑− Siloka bhavipulā
1. Sukhā gharā, Vacchanakha, sahiraññā sabhojanā,
Vacchanakha, households are pleasant, having gold and having food,

−⏑−−¦⏑−−−¦¦⏑−−⏑¦⏑−⏑− Siloka pathyā
Yattha, bhutvā pivitvā ca, sayeyyātha anussuko ti.
Where, after eating and drinking, you can lie down free from desire.

Tattha, {2.232} sahiraññā ti sattaratanasampannā.
In this connection, having gold means being endowed with the seven gems. Gold (suvaṇṇa), silver (rajata), pearl (muttā), gem (maṇi), lapis lazuli (veḷuriya), diamonds (vajira), coral (pavāla). Cf. Ja 219 Garahitajātaka, where 10 treasures are mentioned.

Sabhojanā ti bahukhādanīyabhojanīyā.
Having food means having a lot of staple and non-staple foods.

Yattha bhutvā pivitvā cā ti,
Where, after eating and drinking,

yesu sahiraññabhojanesu gharesu,
in those houses where there is gold and food,

nānaggarasāni bhojanāni paribhuñjitvā, nānāpānāni ca pivitvā. Again there is no finite verb in this sentence, and we have to translate the absolutive as though it were a present participle to give some sort of closure to the sentence.
after eating the various and most tasty foods, and drinking the various drinks.

Sayeyyātha anussuko ti,
You can lie down free from desire,

yesu alaṅkatasirisayanapiṭṭhe, anussuko hutvā, sayeyyāsi,
on the top of a decorated and auspicious bed, being free from desire, you can lie down,

te gharā nāma ativiya sukhā ti.
those houses are known as extremely pleasant.

⏑−−−¦⏑−−−¦¦⏑−−⏑¦⏑−⏑− Siloka pathyā
2. Gharā nānīhamānassa, gharā nābhaṇato ’musā,
No houses for the one who does not exert himself, no houses without speaking lies,

⏑−−−¦⏑−−−¦¦⏑−−⏑¦⏑−⏑− Siloka pathyā
Gharā nādinnadaṇḍassa paresaṁ anikubbato,
No houses for the one with a stick, who does not defraud others,

−−(−−)⏑⏑¦⏑−⏑−¦¦−⏑−⏑¦⏑−⏑− Siloka javipulā
Evaṁ (chiddaṁ) For the metre’s sake we should exclude chiddaṁ. durabhisambhavaṁ, ko gharaṁ paṭipajjatī ti?
So being faulty and hard to endure, who would practice in a house?

Tattha, {2.233} gharā nānīhamānassā ti,
In this connection, no houses for the one who does not exert himself,

niccakālaṁ kasigorakkhādikaraṇena,
all the time, because of farming, herding and so on,

anīhamānassa avāyamantassa gharā nāma natthi,
there are no houses normally for one who does not exert himself, who lacks effort,

gharāvāso na patiṭṭhātī, ti attho.
does not find good support for life in the home, this is the meaning.

Gharā nābhaṇato ’musā ti,
No houses without speaking lies,

khettavatthuhiraññasuvaṇṇādīnaṁ atthāya,
for the purpose of gaining fields, lands, unwrought and wrought gold and so on,

amusābhaṇato pi gharā nāma natthi.
there are no houses normally for one speaking the truth. Lit: not speaking what is not false.

Gharā nādinnadaṇḍassa, paresaṁ anikubbato ti,
No houses for the one with a stick, who does not defraud others,

nādinnadaṇḍassā ti aggahitadaṇḍassa,
for the one with a stick means for the one who takes up a stick,

nikkhittadaṇḍassa paresaṁ anikubbato gharā nāma natthi.
there are no houses for one who discards the stick and does not defraud others.

Yo pana ādinnadaṇḍo hutvā paresaṁ, dāsakammakarādīnaṁ,
The one who takes a stick to others, such as servants and workers,

tasmiṁ tasmiṁ aparādhe aparādhānurūpaṁ,
in that very place must apply a suitable sentence for a crime,

vadhabandhanachedanatāḷanādivasena karoti,
by means of executing, binding, amputating, beating and so on,

tasseva gharāvāso saṇṭhahatī, ti attho.
home life is settled for him, this is the meaning.

Evaṁ chiddaṁ durabhisambhavaṁ, ko gharaṁ paṭipajjatī ti?
So being faulty and hard to endure, who would practice at home?

Taṁ dāni evaṁ, etesaṁ īhanādīnaṁ akaraṇe sati,
So now, while not making these endeavours and so on,

tāya tāya parihāniyā chiddaṁ karaṇe pi sati,
and through each loss there is the making of a fault,

niccam-eva kātabbato durabhisambhavaṁ, durārādhanīyaṁ,
what should be always done is hard to endure, hard to accomplish,

niccaṁ karontassa pi vā durabhisambhavam-eva duppūraṁ gharāvāsaṁ:
or, by always doing what is hard to endure the house life is hard to fulfil,

“Ahaṁ nipparitasso hutvā, ajjhāvasissāmī” ti, ko paṭipajjatī ti?
thinking: “Becoming unagitated, I will live at home,” who would practice (like this)?